Facts about dating abuse

Anemia, cancer, gout, cardiovascular disease and many more disease can be caused from heavy or binge drinking.In the same way as we tend to have a stereotypical picture of what domestic abuse is, we have similar pictures of what sort of person both the abused and the abuser are.Research shows that teen girls are not as likely to be as abusive as teen boys.

A lot of doctors and hospital time and funds are needed to help those who have been victimised or beaten. It is estimated that 1 in 4 women live in abusive relationships, and within our lifetime half of us can expect to be the victim of domestic or intimate violence. More women are killed by their partner or ex-partner than by a stranger (current UK statistics suggest one woman is murdered by her partner or expartner every 3 days).

And even where physical violence has not occurred, the emotional scars can often have a lifelong effect on the victim. Women often have to walk on eggshells and try their best to avoid another incident. This myth encourages the blame-shifting from the abuser to the abused and avoids the stark reality that only the abuser is responsible for his/her own actions.

Teens experiencing dating violence usually tell no one. One study found that only 6% of girls and 11% of boys told anyone about the abuse that they experienced (O'Keefe and Treister, 1998).

Middle school, high school, and college age women experience a higher rate of rape than any other group.

A lot of research is going into the link between drug or alcohol use and violence.

However, although some abusers are more prone to being violent when drunk, many more abuse when completely sober.Teen dating violence and sexual assault is estimated to occur between lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth at about the same rate as in straight teen relationships.(NCAVP, 2001; Dahir, 1999) However, LGBTQ youth are even less likely than heterosexual youth to tell anyone or seek help, and there are fewer resources for these teens.Rape is most likely to be perpetrated by someone the victim knows, such as a friend, an acquaintance, a date, a family member, or a partner (Silverman, Raj, Mucci, and Hathaway, 2001; Warshaw, 1988; Haplem, Oslak, Young, Martin, and Kupper, 2001).Providing facts about sexual abuse is one of the ways to raise awareness about sexual abuse.Very often the constant undermining of the victims self-belief and self-esteem can leave him/her with very little confidence, socially isolated, and without the normal decision-making abilities.

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