What makes a woman intimidating

It seems obvious that Johnny needs the greasers—he is small, passive, and poor, which makes him an easy target of Soc violence. The greasers need a vulnerable friend to give them a sense of purpose.

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His words speak to an important idea in the novel—the futility of the recurring Soc-greaser violence.

The idea Randy presents here has another side to it, however.

Ponyboy speaks these words in Chapter 5, during his stay with Johnny in the abandoned church in Windrixville.

Pony’s realization stems from a comment Johnny makes after reading a passage from Gone with the Wind, in which he says that Dally reminds him of one of the gallant Southern gentlemen from the Civil War.

Ponyboy comes to this conclusion at the end of the novel, as Johnny is dying.

He understands Johnny’s value only when he is about to lose Johnny, which amplifies the pain of the loss.

Randy’s belief in the permanence of their social identities may be based, however, in the fact that he is a Soc and not a greaser.

Having grown up in a wealthy and comfortable environment, it would not be difficult for him to imagine himself forever stuck in this lifestyle.

By agreeing on the basic fact that rich and poor people look at the same sun, Ponyboy and Cherry take a small step toward a potential reconciliation between the rival gangs.

This moment of concord comes early in the narrative, and its idealistic tone makes the rifts and violence to come all the more painful.

As he lies dying in Chapter 9, Johnny Cade speaks these words to Ponyboy.

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